Getting Past False Social Media Signals To Understand People In Real Life

Getting Past False Social Media Signals To Understand People In Real Life


We have found that social media typically represents what people expect from others, but the presence of these events also tells us a lot about who people really are. What if we were told that the social media would tell us how others are when other signals can be distorted?

Do you show loyalty to a particular political cause because it is popular, or do you sacrifice time to rally around it because it is really important to you?

There are activities in real life that reflect different levels of engagement, but how do you know if someone is committed to something?

The more committed you are to something, the more passionate you are about it and the more difficult you are (usually) to deal with things.

The degree of involvement should not be seen as a consideration for audience segmentation, but rather as an indicator for advertisers of how much commitment is lacking in focus.

We knew the same consumer had not visited an open house or a house for sale since then, but we had the information from surfing the Internet. We have seen that this consumer visited three houses for sale in the last week. The user immediately fell into the Google audience of home buyers and searched websites to find his neighbour's house.

This would be a more valuable advertising target if we were mortgage lenders, but we are looking for committed home buyers.

We at Navigator Digital Academy are big fans of location data and Google has analysed more than 15 billion location signals from a variety of pseudonymised devices over the past five years, including Google Maps, Google Street View and the Google Play Store.

Where people are going is an important indicator of what is important to them, and the question that marketers need to ask is: what does the situation say about a particular consumer and what does it not?



Consider a scenario: a consumer with a device is identified as a visitor to an open field, restaurant or theatre. One could conclude that this person loves nature, likes the restaurant in question and visits the play. The venue information, however, could tell a more interesting story.

This weekend, there is a wine festival on the grounds, and in the evening, a wine tasting in the restaurant. On that evening, three jazz bands play in the theatre, so that the profile of the consumer looks like that of a "wine connoisseur" enjoying jazz.

In this scenario, the situation tells us a lot, but for starters, it is much more personal to travel to a place than to click on a link. People who go to physical places make an effort, and they do it in real life, with real people.

Consider a scenario: a consumer with a device is identified as a visitor to an open field, restaurant or theatre. One could conclude that this person loves nature, likes the restaurant in question and visits the play. The venue information, however, could tell a more interesting story.

This weekend, there is a wine festival on the grounds, and in the evening, a wine tasting in the restaurant. On that evening, three jazz bands play in the theatre, so that the profile of the consumer looks like that of a "wine connoisseur" enjoying jazz.

In this scenario, the situation tells us a lot, but for starters, it is much more personal to travel to a place than to click on a link. People who go to physical places make an effort, and they do it in real life, with real people.